DE
22.09.16

Hellabrunn Zoo's autumn babies

Hellabrunn experiences a baby boom not only in spring, the advent of autumn also coincides with a lot of newborn animals frolicking in the zoo.

Copyright: Tierpark Hellabrunn / Marc Müller

Copyright: Tierpark Hellabrunn / Jörg Koch

Copyright: Tierpark Hellabrunn / Jörg Koch

Copyright: Tierpark Hellabrunn / Marc Müller

Copyright: Tierpark Hellabrunn / Marc Müller

The small Dahomey calf is still quite wobbly on his legs and hardly leaves his mum's side - he was after all only born a little over a week ago - but is getting stronger by the day. One of the most charming things about Quh, as the keepers have dubbed the little bull, is that he is smaller than a normal calf: Dahomey dwarf cattle are the smallest cattle in the world. A fully grown adult only reaches a height of about one metre. Visitors to Hellabrunn Zoo can meet Quh and his family in the Children's Zoo. The dwarf cattle originates from Africa, specifically from the former Kingdom of Dahomey, now Benin.

Just behind the Children's Zoo visitors can meet another new arrival in the Polar World where baby Quiana can be seen doing her rounds in the pool in the South American sea lion enclosure. The sea lion pup was born in July, and her big brown eyes are still proving a great attraction for visitors. After spending about 350 days in the womb, Quiana will be suckled for the first six months by her mum Holly. From time to time, the cheeky female pup plays with a fish, which will eventually become her main food. An Adult South American sea lion eats between five and eight kilos of fish and other seafood every day!

And if you continue to walk around the zoo you will find there are many other newborns waiting to be discovered: With a little luck and patience, you may be able to catch a glimpse of the three calves in the nilgai enclosure - Quak, Quirle and Quitte, born in August. The baby Asian antelope are still somewhat shy, but very cute to look at.

The banteng calves, on the other hand, are hard to miss. When the two young bulls Quadro and Quentin are not walking around exploring their enclosure, they can be seen lying down with the other banteng in the group watching the world around them. Banteng are wild cattle that originate from Southeast Asia. The breed is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, which makes the birth of not one but two calves at Hellabrunn all the more joyous.

All baby animals who were born at Hellabrunn Zoo in 2016 have one thing in common: all their names start with the letter "Q ". This follows the zoo's tradition of having the names of all animals born in the same year begin with the same letter. Animals born next year will thus have names beginning with the next letter of the alphabet "R".

The zoo believes that the birthing season is not yet over and therefore expects more new arrivals in the coming weeks, whose names will also begin with the letter "Q". "It is quite possible that there will be more new births among some species any time soon," says zoo director Rasem Baban.

Hellabrunn Zoo is therefore worth a visit during the autumn. Apart from meeting the new arrivals, visitors can experience the zoo in a completely different atmosphere as the trees gradually transform and spread their autumn colour.